Astronomy

mushythoughts:

Our living next door neighbours? 

mushythoughts:

Our living next door neighbours? 

(Source : marshasthoughts)

cwnl:

First-Ever Observations of Comet’s Demise Inside Solar Atmosphere
Image: C/2007 Lulin N3
In a paper to be published tomorrow in the journal Science, for the first time ever scientists at the Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory (LMSAL) at the Advanced Technology Center (ATC) in Palo Alto, and collaborators at other institutions, have reported observations and analysis of the final death throes of a comet, as it passed across the face of the Sun on July 6, 2011, to vanish in flight.
Using observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on board NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the comet was first seen about 0.2 solar radii off the limb of the Sun, travelling at nearly 400 miles per second and was tracked for 20 minutes until it disintegrated and evaporated in the low solar corona, about 62,000 miles above the solar surface.
The Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI), on one of NASA’s twin Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO), made simultaneous additional observations of the comet’s passage from its near-quadrature view relative to the Sun-Earth line.
The comet was discovered on July 4, 2011 by using the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and was designated comet C/2011 N3 (SOHO). It was the SOHO discovery that alerted Lockheed Martin scientists to watch the AIA data stream for the comet’s likely transit across the face of the Sun.

cwnl:

First-Ever Observations of Comet’s Demise Inside Solar Atmosphere

Image: C/2007 Lulin N3

In a paper to be published tomorrow in the journal Science, for the first time ever scientists at the Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory (LMSAL) at the Advanced Technology Center (ATC) in Palo Alto, and collaborators at other institutions, have reported observations and analysis of the final death throes of a comet, as it passed across the face of the Sun on July 6, 2011, to vanish in flight.

Using observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on board NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the comet was first seen about 0.2 solar radii off the limb of the Sun, travelling at nearly 400 miles per second and was tracked for 20 minutes until it disintegrated and evaporated in the low solar corona, about 62,000 miles above the solar surface.

The Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI), on one of NASA’s twin Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO), made simultaneous additional observations of the comet’s passage from its near-quadrature view relative to the Sun-Earth line.

The comet was discovered on July 4, 2011 by using the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and was designated comet C/2011 N3 (SOHO). It was the SOHO discovery that alerted Lockheed Martin scientists to watch the AIA data stream for the comet’s likely transit across the face of the Sun.

(Source : physorg.com, via afro-dominicano)

thefuqua:

Packing the last few shirts into a bloated suitcase. The last glimpse of comfort and the ticking clock face; I swear those hands move faster every day. I’m more confused than ever, but I don’t beg or pray ‘cause the sparkling light from the morning sun is all we should need to feel one.  I reach the station with just minutes to spare. I glance at my watch; time’s going faster these days I swear. Eyes focus up now to the train time table board. There’s only two platforms to be explored, and it’s then that I admit it to my self…
That I am lost, so lost, but your the constellations that guide me. There’s a train at 12; destination disaster. It’s running on time as time runs faster. On platform two it’s destination sustainability; It’s delayed though it was suppose to arrive at 11:50. Platform one it says stand behind the yellow line, but I sit on the platform edge and just gaze at the time. My mind wanders back to our oblivious existence. I’m all choked up now with the threat of distance. As the train bound for disaster chokes up to the station, I don’t board it cause I decide that it’s the wrong destination. But the train bound for sustainability is nowhere to be seen. And I’m lost, so lost, where are the constellations that guide me?
And then I realize that we need to use our own two feet to walk these tracks, and we have to squad up and we have to watch each others backs. When forgiveness is our torch and imagination our sword, well I’ll tie the ropes of hate and slash open the minds of the bored, and we’ll start a world so equal and free. Every inch of this earth is yours all the land and all the sea.
 Imagine no restrictions but the climate and the weather. Then we can explore space together. Forever! And I’m lost so lost,  Where are the constellations?

thefuqua:

Packing the last few shirts into a bloated suitcase. The last glimpse of comfort and the ticking clock face; I swear those hands move faster every day. I’m more confused than ever, but I don’t beg or pray ‘cause the sparkling light from the morning sun is all we should need to feel one.

I reach the station with just minutes to spare. I glance at my watch; time’s going faster these days I swear. Eyes focus up now to the train time table board. There’s only two platforms to be explored, and it’s then that I admit it to my self…

That I am lost, so lost, but your the constellations that guide me.

There’s a train at 12; destination disaster. It’s running on time as time runs faster. On platform two it’s destination sustainability; It’s delayed though it was suppose to arrive at 11:50. Platform one it says stand behind the yellow line, but I sit on the platform edge and just gaze at the time.

My mind wanders back to our oblivious existence. I’m all choked up now with the threat of distance. As the train bound for disaster chokes up to the station, I don’t board it cause I decide that it’s the wrong destination. But the train bound for sustainability is nowhere to be seen.

And I’m lost, so lost, where are the constellations that guide me?

And then I realize that we need to use our own two feet to walk these tracks, and we have to squad up and we have to watch each others backs. When forgiveness is our torch and imagination our sword, well I’ll tie the ropes of hate and slash open the minds of the bored, and we’ll start a world so equal and free. Every inch of this earth is yours all the land and all the sea.


Imagine no restrictions but the climate and the weather. Then we can explore space together. Forever!

And I’m lost so lost,
Where are the constellations?

(Source : inthesssnakepit)

djtopxander:

Supernova 1987A was the closest exploding star seen in modern times. It occurred in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small galaxy that orbits our own Milky Way. Images taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope were combined to make this composite of the blast’s expanding debris. Credit: NASA / ESA / P. Challis and R. Kirshner (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) 
-
Given the incredible amounts of energy in a supernova explosion – as much as the sun creates during its entire lifetime – another erroneous doomsday theory is that such an explosion could happen in 2012 and harm life on Earth. However, given the vastness of space and the long times between supernovae, astronomers can say with certainty that there is no threatening star close enough to hurt Earth.Astronomers estimate that, on average, about one or two supernovae explode each century in our galaxy. But for Earth’s ozone layer to experience damage from a supernova, the blast must occur less than 50 light-years away. All of the nearby stars capable of going supernova are much farther than this.Any planet with life on it near a star that goes supernova would indeed experience problems. X- and gamma-ray radiation from the supernova could damage the ozone layer, which protects us from harmful ultraviolet light in the sun’s rays. The less ozone there is, the more UV light reaches the surface. At some wavelengths, just a 10 percent increase in ground-level UV can be lethal to some organisms, including phytoplankton near the ocean surface. Because these organisms form the basis of oxygen production on Earth and the marine food chain, any significant disruption to them could cascade into a planet-wide problem.Another explosive event, called a gamma-ray burst (GRB), is often associated with supernovae. When a massive star collapses on itself — or, less frequently, when two compact neutron stars collide — the result is the birth of a black hole. As matter falls toward a nascent black hole, some of it becomes accelerated into a particle jet so powerful that it can drill its way completely through the star before the star’s outermost layers even have begun to collapse. If one of the jets happens to be directed toward Earth, orbiting satellites detect a burst of highly energetic gamma rays somewhere in the sky. These bursts occur almost daily and are so powerful that they can be seen across billions of light-years.
For more information visit: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/2012-supernova.html

djtopxander:

Supernova 1987A was the closest exploding star seen in modern times. It occurred in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small galaxy that orbits our own Milky Way. Images taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope were combined to make this composite of the blast’s expanding debris. Credit: NASA / ESA / P. Challis and R. Kirshner (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) 

-

Given the incredible amounts of energy in a supernova explosion – as much as the sun creates during its entire lifetime – another erroneous doomsday theory is that such an explosion could happen in 2012 and harm life on Earth. However, given the vastness of space and the long times between supernovae, astronomers can say with certainty that there is no threatening star close enough to hurt Earth.

Astronomers estimate that, on average, about one or two supernovae explode each century in our galaxy. But for Earth’s ozone layer to experience damage from a supernova, the blast must occur less than 50 light-years away. All of the nearby stars capable of going supernova are much farther than this.

Any planet with life on it near a star that goes supernova would indeed experience problems. X- and gamma-ray radiation from the supernova could damage the ozone layer, which protects us from harmful ultraviolet light in the sun’s rays. The less ozone there is, the more UV light reaches the surface. At some wavelengths, just a 10 percent increase in ground-level UV can be lethal to some organisms, including phytoplankton near the ocean surface. Because these organisms form the basis of oxygen production on Earth and the marine food chain, any significant disruption to them could cascade into a planet-wide problem.

Another explosive event, called a gamma-ray burst (GRB), is often associated with supernovae. When a massive star collapses on itself — or, less frequently, when two compact neutron stars collide — the result is the birth of a black hole. As matter falls toward a nascent black hole, some of it becomes accelerated into a particle jet so powerful that it can drill its way completely through the star before the star’s outermost layers even have begun to collapse. If one of the jets happens to be directed toward Earth, orbiting satellites detect a burst of highly energetic gamma rays somewhere in the sky. These bursts occur almost daily and are so powerful that they can be seen across billions of light-years.

For more information visit: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/2012-supernova.html

(Source : djtopxander)

wake-up-n-live:

The aftermath of a supernova explosion in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

http://protostarmonsite.blogspot.com/

wake-up-n-live:

The aftermath of a supernova explosion in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

http://protostarmonsite.blogspot.com/

(Source : wake-up-n-live)

uraniaproject:

Spiral galaxy M106
by Bernard Miller from Gilbert, ArizonaSpiral galaxy M106, which shines at magnitude 8.4 in the constellation Canes Venatici the Hunting Dogs, dominates this image. But the imager also captured other galaxies. Most prominent is the magnitude 11.2 spiral NGC 4217, which floats in the lower right corner. 

uraniaproject:

Spiral galaxy M106

by Bernard Miller from Gilbert, Arizona
Spiral galaxy M106, which shines at magnitude 8.4 in the constellation Canes Venatici the Hunting Dogs, dominates this image. But the imager also captured other galaxies. Most prominent is the magnitude 11.2 spiral NGC 4217, which floats in the lower right corner. 

(Source : , via uraniaproject)

scipsy:

In this photoset you can see the stunning new image of the Eagle Nebula (a composite of the Herschel in far-infrared and XMM-Newton’s X-ray images), the same region in x-ray only, and a gif  zooming in the center of the nebula showing the “Pillar of Creation”. (via ESO)

http://protostarmonsite.blogspot.com/

(via scipsy)

freespiritmuse:


Incredible New View of Eagle Nebula’s ‘Pillars of Creation’
The European Space Agency’s Herschel space telescope has captured this gorgeous new view of the famed Eagle Nebula.
The Eagle Nebula, located 6,500 light-years away in the constellation  Serpens, is visible as a fuzzy red spot to backyard astronomers with a  modest telescope.
In 1995, NASA’s Hubble space telescope captured a famous image of one region within the Eagle Nebula: a star-forming cluster named NGC6611, known as the “Pillars of Creation.” Light and heat from young stars carved out the iconic pillars, which are each several trillion miles long.
Herschel’s image isn’t just beautiful, it also updates the Hubble  photo and reveals new details about the region. While the Hubble image —  taken in optical wavelengths — suggested that the area was a stellar  nursery, obscuring dust prevented researchers from proving this.
 
The above photo, taken in far-infrared wavelengths that can penetrate  the dust, gives astronomers an insider’s view of the pillars. They can  now see the cocoons of gas and dust that surround the young stars as  they form. Eventually, these casings will blow away and the star’s light  will be visible.

freespiritmuse:

Incredible New View of Eagle Nebula’s ‘Pillars of Creation’

The European Space Agency’s Herschel space telescope has captured this gorgeous new view of the famed Eagle Nebula.

The Eagle Nebula, located 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Serpens, is visible as a fuzzy red spot to backyard astronomers with a modest telescope.

In 1995, NASA’s Hubble space telescope captured a famous image of one region within the Eagle Nebula: a star-forming cluster named NGC6611, known as the “Pillars of Creation.” Light and heat from young stars carved out the iconic pillars, which are each several trillion miles long.

Herschel’s image isn’t just beautiful, it also updates the Hubble photo and reveals new details about the region. While the Hubble image — taken in optical wavelengths — suggested that the area was a stellar nursery, obscuring dust prevented researchers from proving this.

 

The above photo, taken in far-infrared wavelengths that can penetrate the dust, gives astronomers an insider’s view of the pillars. They can now see the cocoons of gas and dust that surround the young stars as they form. Eventually, these casings will blow away and the star’s light will be visible.

(Source : Wired, via freespiritmuse)

hummussexual:

View of Lightning Storms Over Africa Will Knock Your Socks Off [VIDEO]

NASA has released a stunning video taken from the International Space Station that shows the Milky Way and lightning storms over Africa.

This clip was filmed by crew members of Expedition 30 on board the International Space Station. While passing over central Africa — near southeast Niger to the South Indian Ocean, which is southeast of Madagascar – the video picked up breathtaking shots of the Earth below, including the Milky Way creeping over the horizon.

The Milky Way is seen as a hazy glow of white light in the beginning of the video, while various lightning storms are shown over parts of Africa as the space station flies by. In addition, the Lovejoy Comet also makes an appearance near the Milky Way.

As the space station passes over southern African to the ocean, the blindingly bright light at the end is the sun rising over the water.

Who wouldn’t want to take a ride through space after seeing this?

http://protostarmonsite.blogspot.com/

(Source : Mashable, via hummussexual)

the-star-stuff:

Evolution of two equal sized galaxies colliding and forming a massive cloud of gas that will collapse into black hole. 
Credit: Ohio State University

the-star-stuff:

Evolution of two equal sized galaxies colliding and forming a massive cloud of gas that will collapse into black hole.

Credit: Ohio State University

(via the-star-stuff)